Uncategorized

Sausage and Kale Stuffed Venison

time to take advantage of your harvest and make something delicious

two branches homestead

img_0230

At any given time, if you ask us what is in our freezer right now, we can give you a pretty accurate inventory. For those of you who live a similar lifestyle to us, you understand that it is essential to know what you have, what you are running out of, what needs to be used ASAP, and what you might need.

That being said, we have to figure out daily, the answer to “what’s for dinner?”, in a different way. Today while thinking of what was in the freezer, we decided it would be a venison night (we eat venison at least once a week, if not more). Then comes the inventory….what else do we have to make a simple venison roast spectacular and how are we going to prepare it?

The answer came in the form of a Sausage and Kale Stuffed Venison with an Onion Dijon Mustard…

View original post 619 more words

Advertisements
Uncategorized

Homemade Antipasto Pizza for Game day

perfect for a friday night

two branches homestead

img_1721-1

Homemade Pizza

Aside from the kneeling,  the concussion protocol, and all around poor officiating,  there are still a few things we love about game day.  Around here game day usually doesn’t start until dark.  There is always a lot to do here and we would prefer to be outside on a Sunday instead of in front of a t.v.,  but once the sun sets we do enjoy watching football and most of all eating.  We really love to have home made pizza.  This week we came up with a great twist, by combining two of our favorites, pizza and antipasto.  One of the most important ingredients in our pizza is the sauce.  It is made from canned tomatoes from the garden.

img_1705

We simmer them down the day before and add oregano, basil, fresh garlic, and crushed red pepper.  There is nothing as good as chunky homemade homegrown sauce.  The next…

View original post 616 more words

Uncategorized

Homemade Garlic knots

simple and easy. perfect for a rainy cold saturday

two branches homestead

IMG_1509

One of the most delicious and well received additions to any of our meals are homemade garlic knots.  The smell that fills the house when we are making these fills your head with thoughts of your favorite Italian restaurant.  They are soft and fluffy in the center and just a little crisp in the bottom and when combined with butter, olive oil, and fresh garlic from our garden they are heavenly. We start out by using our Italian bread recipe.

Italian Bread Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 (1/4-ounce) envelope active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 cup warm water (100° to 110°)
  • 2 to 3 cups flour
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Again our kitchen aid mixer and its dough hook come in handy.  First we combine yeast, sugar, and 1 cup warm water in bowl of the kitchen aid’s bowl and let stand 5 minutes.

Next we  add 2…

View original post 198 more words

Uncategorized

How to Grow Garlic and Save America

tis the season to plant garlic and here’s how

two branches homestead

IMG_0091

With the whole country divided on every issue, it seems like there is constant disagreement.  However there is one thing everyone can agree upon, garlic is delicious.  The left and the right use it, and every culture takes advantage of its signature flavor.  Garlic is even good for you, it has too many health benefits to list here, and keeps vampires away, supposedly.  It keeps well and is easy to grow,  so why do so few gardeners plant this unifying crop? Growing garlic takes just a few easy steps and a little bit of planning ahead.  We grow hard neck garlic which is well suited for northern climates like ours.  Although garlic is easy to grow, it can be expensive to get started.  With seed companies charging upwards of $5 a bulb, planting more than a few dozen cloves can be cost prohibitive. We were lucky enough to have a…

View original post 660 more words

Uncategorized

Planting onions to save your greens and cabbage

two branches homestead

IMG_0260

For years we grew cabbage and other greens in our garden, but we always ended up with the same result.  All of our cabbage and greens would be riddled with worm holes.  It was always so disappointing to remove the outer leaves of a cabbage to find it full of holes, or pick a bunch of spinach, lettuce, or kale that looked like Swiss cheese.  We set out to find an answer that didn’t include pesticides.  After a lot of research we were no closer to an answer.  Finally one day after reading about homesteaders from the 1800’s, we found the answer was onions.  As it turns out many of the bugs that like greens, don’t like onions.  We decided to try it, what did we have to lose?  We planted onion sets in between our greens.  It was also fortuitous that both greens and onions needed to be planted…

View original post 475 more words