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Homesteading Lessons When To Call in The Experts

two branches homestead

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The truth is you can never be prepared for, or know, everything.  After years of learning through both study and trial and error, I am often reminded of how little I know.  We all like to think of ourselves as an apex predator, as someone who can get the job done.  We fix our own equipment, and we work tirelessly to keep our homesteads running.  But every once in a while its time to call in an expert.  It is so hard to know when to call in the Calvary, in fact most of us probably push it too far.  This week we not only called in an expert, we learned a few valuable lessons about the difference between real farmers and what we do.  It all started several weeks ago when one of our pigs developed what we thought to be an abscess on its belly. img_3678

As we usually…

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farming, Homestead Rescue, homesteading, pigs

Homesteading Lessons When To Call in The Experts

img_3770

The truth is you can never be prepared for, or know, everything.  After years of learning through both study and trial and error, I am often reminded of how little I know.  We all like to think of ourselves as an apex predator, as someone who can get the job done.  We fix our own equipment, and we work tirelessly to keep our homesteads running.  But every once in a while its time to call in an expert.  It is so hard to know when to call in the Calvary, in fact most of us probably push it too far.  This week we not only called in an expert, we learned a few valuable lessons about the difference between real farmers and what we do.  It all started several weeks ago when one of our pigs developed what we thought to be an abscess on its belly. img_3678

As we usually do, we researched treatments and causes.  We asked friends with more experience, but still were unsure of what we were dealing with.  We toyed with the idea of lancing it ourselves and as it grew, so did our stress level. We did not have the knowledge of a pig farmer, who probably would have culled this pig as it was 100lbs or so and could have been of some use.  This was the moment that we realized that it was time to call in the expert.  We are fortunate where we live to still have a real country vet.  A small but important side note: It also helps that his daughter and our son will soon be married.  Doc Caucci from Orson Corners Veterinary clinic took time out on a 90 degree Saturday to come down and take a look at our pig named “Olive”, with the mystery swelling, Yes, we know, we should not name our food, but somehow it brings us peace when the “appointment” day comes. img_3775

When doc arrived he was ready for business,  we had only seen him work on our cat before, and in all of our time spent together at BBQ’s and family functions I had never seen this side of him.  He gathered his tools as a master carpenter would and went to work.  First it became very apparent that Olive, our most skittish pig of course, would need to be sedated.  Doc jumped into the pen like a veteran boxer and went to work.  After several attempts, and with all hands on deck, we were able to corner Olive with some plywood boards.  Luke, our younger son, was instrumental in this process.  After she was sedated, we removed her from the pen and placed her on a clean tarp.  Again having a strong 17 year old son was a blessing.  As Doc plied his trade, the truth was revealed.  It was not an abscess, but in fact, a hernia.  It was at this point that I was very happy I didn’t try and lance it by myself.  Doc, wearing his blue vet’s coveralls, went to work.  We placed olive on her back in a chute that we constructed.

Luke and I held her legs as Doc went to work.  The confident ease with which Doc worked was astounding.  It made me think of a great guitar player, how their fluid movements make it look so easy, until you pick up the guitar and realize it isn’t.  Within minutes Olive’s muscle layer and skin were stitched up.  As we stood looking down at her I was again thankful for both Doc and my decision not to take matters into my own hands.

We then placed Olive in isolation in her own house with fresh hay to recover.  It struck me how drained we all were after this experience, except doc, who disinfected his boots and looked ready for another round.  I guess when you flip cow stomachs and deliver calves, a little hernia surgery is no big deal, but for us it sure seemed like a miracle.  After several days she was back with the other pigs.  I’m not sure she even remembers what happened.  Homesteading  blesses us with challenges, and teaches us solutions.  It never is boring or just the same old thing over and over.  So many people ask us if we think it’s worth it, or if it’s fair to the animals, but when was the last time you gave your pork chop surgery, or misted her tongue with refreshing water as she recovered from anesthesia?  We care about these animals and give them a great life full of pets and treats. I am certain they are happier than any factory farmed pigs.  We are also not naive, we know that there is no way everyone can live this way, but we are thankful that we can. The decision to call in an expert is never easy, and when we need to it doesn’t make us weak or any less, it makes us human.

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My New Found Relationship with Beets

its a good time for this one beets are looking good in the garden

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As the winter begins to wear on,  I often think about warmer weather and the past summer.  Sometimes I scroll through our pictures on cold days, usually looking at pictures of our homestead, and I am always drawn to pictures of food.  Today I stumbled upon this picture and it drew my attention immediately.  It looked like comfort food, like something I’d love to eat on a cold day.  I remembered the story of how this meal came to be.  Sometimes a meal is an old favorite, and sometimes it is a conscious decision to try something new, but this meal was a little different.  One day I posted a picture on Instagram of some beautiful beets that we had grown.

I always boiled beets and loved them prepared that way.  But one of my IG friends suggested that I roast them.  So I decided to try some roasted beets. …

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cooking, gardening, homemade, homesteading, sauerkraut

Making Sauerkraut Simple Deliciousness

IMG_3473There are few foods more polarizing than sauerkraut.  Some people love it and some people hate it.  It is no different here on the homestead.  One year we had an abundance of cabbage, and wanted to preserve it.  When the subject of making our own kraut arose it was met with mixed emotions.  I believe the word “yuck” was used.  We had picked up a nice 5 gal crock at a yard sale so we had the perfect vessel.  So we took our abundance of cabbage and went to work. IMG_0260

We were immediately amazed by the list of  ingredients, cabbage and kosher salt, that was it.  We started by taking our cabbages (5 pounds) and removed the outer leaves, we then washed any dirt from the head. img_3650

We quartered the heads and removed the stem, setting it aside.  Next we shredded the cabbage by cutting thinly with a sharp knife.

 

 

After the cabbage is shredded we placed 1/3 of in the crock and sprinkled 1 tbs of salt over it, and then mashed it with a big wood dowel (which, to be honest, was the cut off end of a closet rod). img_3654.jpg

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We mashed until we didn’t hear and more crunching, we then did the same with the other thirds.  We also add in the stems, which make a tasty snack.  Once the cabbage was salted and mashed we covered it with a clean dish towel and let it sit over night.  The next day we looked to see how much water had been drawn from the cabbage,  we were looking for enough water to cover all the cabbage.img_3662

We wanted to have at least 3″ of water over the cabbage.  If there is not enough water you can make your own brine by combining 1 tbs of salt with 1 qt of water.  When you have enough brine covering the cabbage, you simply take a plate and put it over the cabbage being careful not to trap any air under the plate. Then add a weight to hold it down. Our favorite method for this is a sterilized mason jar full of water. Finally, skim any stray cabbage from the surface.img_3663

We cover the crock with the dish towel, place in a cool location, and wait for the magic to happen. img_3659

The magic is fermentation. Sauerkraut is a fermented food and wonderful for your gut.  We check on our kraut every week and skim any mold that forms on the surface of the water.  There will be an interesting aroma that rises from the crock and you may be accused of flatulence if you are standing near it.  After a month or so we taste the kraut to see if it is tangy enough, if not we wait another week. IMG_3269

When the kraut flavor is to our liking, we remove it from the crock, and since it has been such a long wait we have no choice but to cook up our favorite kielbasa and try it out. img_3708

This is when our “yuck” was turned into a “wow”.  Any extra kraut is canned (process 20 min/qts) and saved for another day.IMG_3473

Home made sauerkraut is totally different from what you get in a store.  It is fresh, mild, and the perfect compliment to a homegrown meal.  It is not often that you find a simple recipe that works so perfectly.  Home made sauerkraut is two simple ingredients and some help from mother nature.  Making home made sauerkraut is exactly what homesteading is about, getting back to basics.

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A Lesson in Wood Shavings

two branches homestead

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On a cold February day,  my son Luke and I set out to make an ax handle. In the process, we received an unexpected lesson.  In a world with Home Depot and Amazon, we give little thought to buying the things we need.  The things we need are always at our fingertips, or at most a short drive or two days shipping away.  However, there are still a few things out there that you can’t get by just clicking a button and a handle for an old ax is one of them.  So we took a page out of our ancestors book, and when we needed something we made it from what was available.  The ax was special to us, as it had belonged to an older gentleman that had lived near us.  When he would walk by our house he would sometimes stop and talk and we always listened. …

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